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Why become a chief editor?
How do I change my hub's settings?
How do I choose a topic for my hub?
Are duplicate hubs OK?
Do I own my hub?
Do I need a linking strategy?
What is a Pool Account?
What is a Total CPM?
How is Writer CPM determined?
How do I publish my own articles?
How do I create a new hub?
How do I get my hub on it's own domain?
When does a hub become neglected?
How do categories work?

Why become a chief editor?

Mainly because it's fun, or because you'd like to provide a good resource for readers on a particular topic.

It can also pay well as chief editors can take a CPM commission on all hub articles if they choose to.

However it is hard work getting a self-sustaining hub up and running, especially in the beginning.

You'll most likely need to write and edit your own articles for quite a while until your hub is attracting enough readers to then attract other writers, and finally other editors.

However once a hub becomes self-sustaining then the chief editor can take a more relaxed oversight role if they choose to, though most still enjoy contributing to their own hubs.
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How do I change my hub's settings?

Click on the "My Hubs" link in the navbar and you'll be shown a list of your hubs.

From here use the links to the right to view more details ("details") or change the hub's settings ("edit").

You can also upload heading and email newsletter images ("images") and create an FAQ for your hub ("faq").

On each hub's edit page you'll be able to change a number of settings including the CPM commissions given to writers, editors, and chief editors. Any changes made to the CPM rates will only effect articles published from that time forward.
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How do I choose a topic for my hub?

A hub can cover any topic, as long as it is not adult in nature.

However the best hubs contain mostly evergreen content. These are articles that remain useful over time.

For instance a recipe for caramel tarts will remain useful to readers forever (evergreen) and continue to earn a commission making is easier to recoup the writers investment of time in writing the article.

An article on a political event however needs to attract a large number of readers straight away before it become yesterday's news.
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Are duplicate hubs OK?

Yes duplicate hubs are completely OK. Nobody on hubgarden has a monopoly on any topic, and competition is good for everyone.

Having said that, you may want to see what hubs already exist and how well they are doing before deciding if you have a chance of competing.
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Do I own my hub?

Hubgarden retains ownership of hubs, domains, and copyright of the content.

This allows us to protect the interests of writers who have submitted content to each hub and make sure they continue to earn a commission on their articles.

Chief editors may be removed from a hub if it becomes neglected, or if a large number of the hub's writers and editors make a good case for removal. However we reserve the right to remove a chief editor for any reason. In practice the removal of a chief editor from a hub for a reason other than neglect should be a rare occurrence.

If a chief editor is removed from a hub, or hands over the chief editorship to someone else, they will continue to earn a chief editor commission on existing articles but not future articles.
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What is a Pool Account?

Each hub has a pool account which is used to pay for awards and links.

The pool account is built up from the Pool CPM commission, applied to every article on the hub. The level of pool CPM commission is specified by the chief editor.

The amount in each hub's pool account can be seen on it's details page, along with it's pool CPM.

HubGarden may contribute to the pool accounts of new hubs if we think it has potential and there are sufficient funds available.

Chief editors are also able to transfer their account balance to their hub pools to give them a boost.
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What is a Total CPM?

Total CPM is determined by the actual CPM that the hub earns from advertisers.

This can vary between hubs depending on topic, the amount of search engine traffic compared to subscribers, and a number of other factors.

If a hub's Total CPM is altered the chief editor will be notified as they may wish to alter the other CPM rates.
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How is Writer CPM determined?

The Writer CPM for a hub is determined by taking the Total CPM and then subtracting the Chief Editor CPM, the Editor CPM, and the Pool CPM.
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How do I publish my own articles?

To publish your own article click on the notify editor link as normal.

The notification will then appear in your Editor Notifications and you'll be able to publish the article from there.
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How do I create a new hub?

Go to hubgarden.com, login, and click on "New Hub".

The hub will then be listed on your "My Hubs" page, from where you can edit the hub's settings.
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How do I get my hub on it's own domain?

To get it's own domain (mysuperhub.com instead of mysuperhub.hubgarden.com) a hub needs to have published 50 quality articles.

Once that point has been reached leave a message on the HubGarden forum and we'll start the process of finding a suitable domain name.
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When does a hub become neglected?

A hub is declared neglected if there are less than 8 articles published in a given month, or editors are not responding to requests to publish articles within 3 working days.

At this point a hub may be allocated to another chief editor.

Note that this is not an absolute rule. Chief editors may be removed for other reasons if a hub is not being run well, although this should be very rare.
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How do categories work?

Categories are created automatically when an article in which they are used is published.

They usually look best if capitalised.

To edit categories use the "My Hubs" page, and click on "Categories" and then "edit". Be careful with the delete button - there is no "yes/no" confirmation.

If you rename one category to be the same as another it will merge them, including an automatic edit of the articles involved.

In most cases the default settings for categories should work just fine, however there are a few tweaks available.

In each hub's setting you can specify the number of categories shown on the homepage and category pages using "Category Display Limit". It's not a good idea to display more than 60 categories on one page.

It's also possible to specify the order in which they're selected and sorted using the "Category Sort Order" setting.

The default sort order is article_number. Definitions below:

* article_number: Order by most articles to least.

* alphabetical: Order by category title.

* sorting_letter: Order by each category "sorting letter". This can be specified manually for each category.

**Advanced**

Each category can also be assigned a "type". This is useful in grouping categories together. Higher category types are grouped together above lower category types and in a different color.

A Level can also be assigned to each category. Categories of different levels can be combined to form sub-categories if they have both been assigned to at least one article.

For instance you may make all the location categories one level (sydney, melbourne, brisbane). They will then combine with all other categories of a different level (parks, walks, galleries) to form sub-categories (sydney/parks). Categories of the same level type will not form subcategories. For instance sydney/melbourne would not be possible in the example above, nor would parks/walks.

Often categories of a particular type will also have the same level, however this is not always true.
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